Albums to watch

I Can feel You Creep Into My Private Life

tUnE-YaRdS

I Can feel You Creep Into My Private Life

Fourth album of indie art-pop from Merrill Garbus, with long-time band-member Nate Brenner sharing the writing and production duties

ADM rating[?]

7.3

Label
4AD
UK Release date
19/01/2018
US Release date
19/01/2018
  1. 10.0 |   The Digital Fix

    The first great album of 2018
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  2. 8.3 |   A.V. Club

    It may lack the punch of Nikki Nack, but for those willing to hang around and appreciate its jammier approach, it’s a cathartic, worthwhile stop along the Tune-Yards catalog
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  3. 8.0 |   The FT

    Reminiscent of early Talking Heads, the songs include a haunting portrait of technological alienation
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  4. 8.0 |   The Observer

    The thrill of her cool self-appraisal is boosted by a new sound, more liberating party than pious penance, that integrates a taste for the euphoric early days of dance into the duo’s melange
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  5. 8.0 |   The Skinny

    Tune-Yards tackle important current issues on their most upbeat record yet, I can feel you creep into my private life
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  6. 8.0 |   Rolling Stone

    Per usual, the core remains Garbus' beat science, hypnotically looped and stuttered, driven by handclaps, drumstick clatter and her increasingly varied vocal displays, which are more processed than usual here
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  7. 8.0 |   Drowned In Sound

    While a lot of these songs would be called ‘floor fillers’, they’re not uncomplicated
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  8. 8.0 |   Exclaim

    Cogent and catchy all at once, I can feel you creep into my private life shows that, even amid doubt and distress, Tune-Yards can find a new way forward
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  9. 8.0 |   The Irish Times

    By the end, Garbus’s mix of far-flung dance gestures and world-questioning lyrics coalesces into beguiling logic. It’s never as simple as it seems on the surface
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  10. 8.0 |   Record Collector

    Garbus allows deepening matters of power and politics to creep in to her lyrics, with her facility for flexible afro/ indie-pop hybrids smoothing the way
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  11. 8.0 |   Uncut

    An entertainingly disruptive blast of a record with a mirrorball lure, refracting everything from Motown to early-'80s disco and funk, boom bap, '90s piano house and contemporary R&B
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  12. 8.0 |   Mojo

    Reflective, restless, fiercely engaged, it feels like it's in constant process of rethinking and remodeling, slicing off bits of musical flesh and slapping them back on elsewhere as it dips and bounces along the street. Print edition only

  13. 8.0 |   NME

    Tune-Yards might have taken a deep breath and a step back, allowing their infectious melodies some space, but their breathless skew-whiff eclecticism remains anything but safe
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  14. 8.0 |   The Guardian

    An album custom-built for 2018
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  15. 8.0 |   The Independent

    Tune-Yards’ characteristically confrontational approach acquires a new brusque confidence on this fourth album
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  16. 8.0 |   The Line Of Best Fit

    Garbus chooses to examine the inherent privileges she is afforded by swiping her white-American library card through other cultures, while simultaneously fighting patriarchal bluster at home. It’s also a lot of fun
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  17. 8.0 |   Slant Magazine

    Her most contemplative album to date
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  18. 8.0 |   The 405

    A record dominated by the society it both critiques and is a part of
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  19. 8.0 |   Under The Radar

    As with every song here, one can't help but wonder at the end, "What's she going to do next?"
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  20. 7.8 |   Earbuddy

    Good music is often challenging. Combine that with Garbus’s great ear for melody and exciting rhythms and you have another winner from Tune-Yards
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  21. 7.0 |   Spectrum Culture

    There are only so many beats and so many issues you can tackle at once
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  22. 7.0 |   music OMH

    Doesn’t quite hit the immense heights of her first two albums, but this is still Merrill Garbus doing her own thing – which is something that’s always worth paying attention to
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  23. 7.0 |   Clash

    A uniquely energetic, smart record in danger of over-saturation
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  24. 7.0 |   Paste Magazine

    As socially conscious as albums come
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  25. 7.0 |   God Is In The TV

    Despite admitting to hiding behind her hands and avoiding responsibility from important global issues recently, sticking her musical ethics is something she hasn’t shied away from completely
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  26. 6.8 |   Gig Soup

    Might be Tune-Yards’ smartest album yet
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  27. 6.2 |   Pitchfork

    Musically and lyrically ambitious, but its grander themes land with an uncomfortable thud
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  28. 6.0 |   Evening Standard

    As unsettling as it is entertaining
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  29. 6.0 |   NOW

    When it works, it’s as joyful as the best Tune-Yards songs
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  30. 6.0 |   PopMatters

    New England duo tUnE-yArDs shoot for a more accessible sound on their fourth studio album, I Can Feel You Creep Into My Private Life
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  31. 6.0 |   The Arts Desk

    Unfortunately Garbus has stopped forcing open new sonic doors and throwing new sonic furniture around the place
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  32. 6.0 |   Q

    Despite operating in the between-floors world of indie R&B, it connects both sonically and melodically and as such engages the listener rather than, as in the past, totally overwhelming them. Print edition only

  33. 6.0 |   Loud And Quiet

    This record – though eminently listenable, with its upbeat intensity and light-hearted dance loops – seems void of the white-hot anger that ought to result from its subject matter
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  34. 5.0 |   Crack

    Although I can feel you creep into my private life is a thematically ambitious record, tUnE-yArDs have come off sounding slightly out of touch
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  35. 4.0 |   Tiny Mix Tapes

    It changes the sounds of the band from the bombastic elastic to the crouched minor. It changes the hopes of the band from boundless to restrictive. It limps, self-conscious and careful: who has a hand in hope, anyway?
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